Everything You Need to Know About Socket Preservation

Most humans have 32 teeth and every single one of them is precious, but there may come a time where a tooth needs to be extracted because of trauma, caries (tooth decay) or advanced periodontal disease. Since replacing an extracted tooth as soon as possible is recommended, most patients focus on their replacement options which range from partial denture to dental bridge to dental implantWhile that is an important decision, there is a more immediate concern at extraction, and that is socket preservation (also called alveolar ridge preservation).

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Wisdom Teeth Recovery Timeline

Wisdom teeth removal surgery is an outpatient procedure that removes the last molars, also called wisdom teeth. Outpatient surgery means you will arrive and leave the facility on the same day, with no overnight stay. While the procedure itself is routine to the professionals who perform it daily, it can be a scary prospect for those who are undergoing the surgery, which is understandable. Thankfully, there is little to worry about and patients recover quickly afterward in most cases. The following is more specifics on what you can expect during wisdom teeth recovery: 

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5 Common Misconceptions About Dental Bone Grafts

As the United States population continues to age and dental implants increasingly become a popular alternative to dentures and bridges, more Americans will be faced with the prospects of a dental bone graft.

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Why Spring and Summer Break are the Best Time for Wisdom Tooth Removal

When you’re facing oral surgery for wisdom teeth removal, you want to choose the best time. Wisdom teeth removal will necessitate some recovery time, so you should consider times when you won’t have other obligations like work or school. Following are several reasons why spring break and summer break are the best times for wisdom teeth removal.

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Wisdom Teeth: Should They Stay or Should They Go?

Have you ever considered that teeth serve as milestones in life? Much is made of the appearance of a child's first tooth, and then approximately five years later when that tooth loosens and comes out in preparation for the emergence of its permanent successor. Many families choose to celebrate that loss with the custom of the tooth fairy, which can be expensive if she returns each time another tooth comes out. Not as much attention is paid when the last four teeth of the thirty-two permanent teeth make their way through the gums — unless they cause problems, which unfortunately is the case for many people. And if you are one of these individuals, you may find yourself facing the decision of whether to have your wisdom teeth removed or to just let them stay and see what happens.

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Risks Involved With Not Removing Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth removal commonly occurs in a patients mid-teens to early twenties, typically on breaks from school.  However, a commonly asked question is, “Do I need to have my wisdom teeth removed?”  While this depends on your specific clinical condition, there are a number of important factors to consider.

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What does an Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon do?

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons are dentists who pursue rigorous additional surgical specialty training of four or six years after completion of dental school. After residency, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons can pursue becoming board-certified in the specialty (Diplomates of the American Board or Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery). This requires passing rigorous written and oral examinations.

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Northwest Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Recommends the COVID-19 Vaccine

Northwest Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery is not offering the COVID-19 Vaccine at this time, however our board-certified oral surgeons strongly recommend those over 65 years of age, and/or those with a chronic medical condition, to sign-up as soon as possible to receive the COVID-19 Vaccine from your local provider.

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What Are Tori, Can They Be Removed, and Why Should They Be Removed?

Tori are benign (non-cancerous) growths of extra bone in the mouth.They most commonly occur on the tongue side of the lower jaw on both sides.  Tori also occur on the palate, or roof of the mouth. Approximately 40% of males and 20% of females may have these growths of bone.They may sometimes be associated with clenching or bruxing. 

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X-rays and Oral Surgery

Oral surgeons use X-rays to help diagnose disease, pathology, trauma, and dentofacial deformities that are not visible during a clinical examination. When examining X-rays, oral surgeons can more accurately identify issues worth addressing, such as impacted teeth or general decay. Many oral surgeons rely on panoramic X-rays or a Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan as they develop plans for dental implants and other necessary procedures. Below are some answers to some commonly asked questions by our patients.

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